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Hokulea Voyage Recap

By: Steve Frailey Wednesday May 24, 2017 comments Tags: polynesians, canoe plants, Hokulea-Voyage

In today's world, where most of us navigate by GPS-enabled smartphones, it's hard to remember how challenging navigation really is! Particularly for Polynesian explorers, who navigated the Pacific Ocean without even a compass, much less latitude and longitude, navigation was an art form.

The Hokulea Polynesian Voyaging Society helps keep that legacy alive by continuing to practice traditional methods of navigation, which were nearly extinct before they intervened to preserve the ancient knowledge. They also work to raise Polynesian cultural awareness and campaign for environmental preservation.

We want to bring your attention to this organization, because we think they're doing some really incredible work. After all, the Polynesian colonists who so bravely explored the Pacific had a direct impact on our family's lives, and the lives of everyone who has benefited from our noni products. We think that legacy is worth protecting!

Visit their website here, and keep reading to learn more!

An Epic World-Wide Journey

The Hokulea Polynesian Voyaging Society currently has two Polynesian voyaging canoes, Hokulea and Hikianalia, sailing across Earth's oceans. Their mission is to campaign for a more sustainable future, while also raising awareness about Polynesian navigation methods and culture.

The Hawaiian name for the voyage, Malama Honua, means to care for our Earth, reflecting their mission to spread the idea that our natural world is a gift with limits and that we must carefully steward this gift if we are to survive together, as the Hokulea website so eloquently puts it.

The Art of Polynesian Navigation

Whenever I really take time to think about the methods ancient Polynesians used to navigate, I can't believe they ever made it out of sight of land, much less all the way to the Hawaiian Islands and beyond!

Polynesian way finders didn't have access to compasses, sextants, or even clocks to establish their position and chart a course. Instead, they used signs from nature to determine direction and location.

Polynesian Wayfinding Methods

  • Ocean swells, wave patterns, and currents
  • The Star Compass (click here to learn more)
  • Movement of the sun and moon
  • Migratory paths of birds and behavior of animals at sea
  • Wind patterns

You can learn more about how courses are charted by clicking here.

HOKULEA COMING HOME AFTER 3 YEARS AND 47,000 MILES

Hawai‘i’s iconic voyaging canoe Hōkūle‘a will conclude its epic three-year sail around the globe and return home to the Hawaiian Islands in June 2017. The mission of the Mālama Honua Worldwide Voyage sponsored by Hawaiian Airlines was to weave a lei of hope around the world through sharing indigenous wisdom, groundbreaking conservation and preservation initiatives while learning from the past and from each other, creating global relationships, and discovering the wonders of the Island Earth.

On Saturday, June 17, Hōkūle‘a and its crew members will make their historic return to Hawai‘i at O‘ahu’s Magic Island after sailing more than 40,000 nautical miles since departing O‘ahu for the first deep sea leg of the voyage in May 2014. Hōkūle‘a will sail into Magic Island along with a fleet of about seven deep sea voyaging canoes from Hawai‘i, Tahiti and New Zealand. The homecoming celebration, themed Lei Ka‘apuni Honua, meaning “A Lei Around The World,” honors the journey of connecting cultures and people around the world.

Fun Facts:
Built: 1975  Sailed: 140,000 Nautical miles
Length: 62 Feet   Width: 20 feet

Read More: http://www.hokulea.com/vessels/hokulea/

March 2017

The around the world voyage is quickly approaching it’s conclusion. After leaving the West Coast, the Hokulea sailed across the Pacific to Rapa Nui (Easter Island). The Hokulea is due home to Hawaii in June to a very large Homecoming Celebration. You may follow the last legs of the voyage at hokulea.com

Feb 2017

The Worldwide Voyage is finagling coming to an end. The 3 years around the world voyage will end this June as the Hokulea returns to Hawaii. The canoe past through the Panama Canal and headed west to the Galápagos Islands. You can follow this amazing voyage around the world at hokulea.com 

Jan 2017

The Worldwide voyage continues as the Hokulea left Miami, then Cuba, and is currently waiting to enter the Panama Canal. The Hokulea will be leaving the Atlantic Ocean traveling through the Canal to the Pacific Ocean. After visiting several more stops on the West coast, the Hokulea is scheduled to return home this June to Hawaii after her 3 year, 47,000 mile voyage around the world. You can follow this amazing voyage at hokulea.com!

What a spectacular under taking by so many dedicated individuals. Just think of all the planning, preparation and then the actual voyage - proving the ancient Polynesians sailed around the world with no navigational instruments, taking Noni Fruit as a “canoe plant” to share with other native cultures.

THE JOURNEY SO FAR
Miles Traveled: 36,519
Countries Visited: 16
Ports Visited: 149
Volunteer Crew Members: 220
Miles Left: 13,800

Dec 2016

The Worldwide voyage continues as the Hōkūleʻa left dry dock and is currently sailing down the east coast of the US to Miami, Florida. You can follow this amazing voyage around the world at www.hokulea.com

To me, this is an amazing voyage by many, many volunteers, that proves the Polynesians sailed around the world long before instrumentation existed: by navigating using only the stars, planets, wave patterns, clouds, and birds as they approached land. Noni Fruit was one of the 27 “canoe plants” that the early Polynesians took with them on their journeys, as they used Noni Fruit as raw food and medicine.

Nov 2016

Hōkūleʻa and the crew recently sailed through Lake Champlain, a lake that has 587 miles of coastline spanning two states and two countries! The lake drains north from Whitehall, New York to the outlet at the Richelieu River in Quebec. From there, the water flows into the St. Lawrence River and eventually into the Atlantic Ocean at the Gulf of Saint Lawrence!

Oct 2016

Did you know that Noni spread across the world in the canoes of ancient Polynesian voyagers? These explorers took plants along with them that they would need to survive in their new homes. As their main medicinal plant, eaten every day as a natural preventative, Noni was guaranteed a place as a “Canoe Plant.”

These Polynesian voyagers sailed the open ocean using no navigational instruments. Skilled navigators read the stars, clouds, wave patterns, and more to find their way.

The Hokulea Polynesian Voyaging Society has preserved this ancient navigational knowledge. They currently have 2 Polynesian voyaging canoes out on an epic 47,000 mile voyage to 85 ports and 26 countries, to prove that the ancient Polynesian navigational methods still work today!

The Hokulea is currently sailing back down the East coast of North America after crossing the Pacific Ocean, Indian Ocean and the Atlantic Ocean!! They sailed into New York harbor last summer and then on to Nova Scotia.

On their website, you can read amazing stories of this trip around the world and track their voyage.
Keep following, and check out www.hokulea.com to learn more about this incredible journey!

Sept 2016

The Hokulea WorldWide Voyage just left the most Northern point of its journey - Nova Scotia. Currently, they're navigating the Great Lakes and you should check out their website for some very interesting updates and videos!
 
What an amazing voyage. 3 years and 47,000 miles, with no navigational instrumentation. They are truly proving that the Polynesians sailed around the world long before Western Civilizations. Keep following, and check out www.hokulea.com to learn more about this incredible journey!

Aug 2016

After leaving New York Harbor, the Hokulea Worldwide Voyage’s sailing canoe has reached its farthest Northern port of call in Nova Scotia!! The 3 year, 47,000 mile voyage is more than one half completed After spending a week in Nova Scotia, sharing with the local indigenous Indians, the canoe will begin its Voyage back down the east coast of the US, pass through the Panama Canal – heading back home to Hawaii. For more very good information about this amazing voyage, proving the early Polynesians sailed around the world with no navigational instruments, visit www.hokulea.com

July 2016

Keep following, and check out www.hokulea.com to learn more about this incredible journey!

This amazing 3 years, around the world voyage by the Hokulea, has just reached it’s Northern most point of the voyage – Nova Scotia. Check out their website for some very interesting updates and videos.

June 2016

The Hokulea WorldWide Voyage has currently entered New York Harbor to celebrate Oceans Day and present to the UN several proclamations from various countries the Hokulea has visited on it’s around the world voyage. The proclamations are asking for observance of our Oceans and Sustainability.

What an amazing voyage, 3 years and 47,000 miles, with no navigational instrumentation. They are truly proving that the Polynesians sailed around the world long before Western Civilizations.

May 2016

Did you know that noni spread across the world in the canoes of ancient Polynesian voyagers? These explorers took plants along with them that they would need to survive in their new homes. As their main medicinal plant, eaten every day as a natural preventative, noni was guaranteed a place as a “Canoe Plant.” These Polynesian voyagers sailed the open ocean using no navigational instruments. Skilled navigators read the stars, clouds, wave patterns, and more to find their way.

April 2016

The Hokulea Polynesian Voyaging Society has preserved this ancient navigational knowledge. They currently have 2 Polynesian voyaging canoes out on an epic 47,000 mile voyage to 85 ports and 26 countries, to prove that the ancient Polynesian navigational methods still work today!
 
The Hokulea is currently sailing up the East coast of North America after crossing the Pacific Ocean, Indian Ocean and the Atlantic Ocean!! They are heading for New York Harbor!! On their website, you can read amazing stories of this trip around the world and track their voyage. Check out their website to learn more!

March 2016

The Hokulea WorldWide Voyage is currently in the Caribbean Sea near the British Virgin Islands. While in the Caribbean, the crew will be exploring the similarities and differences between how Polynesian Islanders and Caribbean Islanders approach sustainability.
 
“Everybody should start thinking about this, considering what kinds of contributions you can make at your home to the totality of protecting the earth,” says Master Navigator Nainoa Thompson. “Because when we look at it as individuals or just from small communities, a tiny place like the Hawaiian Islands… from our lens, no matter what we do, it’s not going to have enough scale and impact to really save the earth. But if you do it, and hope and believe that others are doing it at the same time, when you look the thousands of efforts that are taking place on earth – then you have scale.”
 
The voyage is still en route to New York Harbor, where they hope to arrive in early June. Keep following, and check out http://www.hokulea.com/ to learn more about this incredible journey!

Feb 2016

I hope you have taken time to visit the Hokulea website to and follow this amazing voyage around the world. They crossed the Atlantic for the first time ever and landed in Brazil. Currently, the voyage is headed up the coast to eventually enter New York Harbor! They are proving that the Polynesians had the ability to sail around the world without any navigational instrumentation, just simply by reading the stars, moon, sun, waves etc.

Jan 2016

We’ve been following the progress of the Hokule’a Worldwide Voyage, a round-the-world trip being made by traditional Polynesian vessels using traditional navigation methods.

The Hokule’a Polynesian voyaging canoe just entered the Atlantic Ocean for the first time. Leaving African coast they had to sail through fog for the first time ever — it’s hard to navigate with no stars, moon or sun! They had to rely on the feel of the wave patterns crossing the double hull canoe to find their way!
 
The voyage is currently on their way to Brazil, and from there they’ll make their way all the way up to New York Harbor!

Dec 2015

The Hokulea Worldwide Voyage’s sailing cane landed in Cape Town, South Africa about two weeks ago. They’ve been making repairs and doing maintenance to the ship, as well as doing lots of speaking, educating, and learning about global sustainability. In 2016, they will be sailing to South America, using only traditional Polynesian navigation techniques, so keep your eyes out for updates!

Have you ever heard of the Hokule'a?
-A Polynesian double haul canoe built in Hawaii to prove that the Polynesians sailed the oceans with no navigational instrumentation
 

-Before the inaugural voyage in 1976 from Hawaii to Pape’ete Tahiti, most people said it was impossible to sail across the vast oceans …using only the stars, winds, currents and birds to guide them.
 
-The voyage of Rediscovery (1985-1987) covered a total of 12,000 miles. It stared in Hawaii and sailed to destinations throughout Polynesia, that’s what magnificent sailors they were.
 
-In 1999, the Hokule’a sailed from Hawaii to Rapa Nui (Eastern Island) “closing the triangle in the Pacific Ocean. Sailing to Rapa Nui, proved that the ancient voyagers could sail against the prevailing winds i.e. sail anywhere in the oceans of the world.
 
-In 2014, the Hokule’a and a sister ship left the Big Island of Hawaii on a 3 year, 47,000 mile sailing voyage around the World!! They have sailed to Tahiti, Samoa, Fiji and are currently sailing into New Zealand. In Samoa, they met the UN Secretary for a proclamation of “One World”. They plan on meeting with the UN Secretary again in about 1 year when they sail into New York harbor as they circumvent the oceans.

Steve Frailey

About the Author: Steve Frailey

My wife and I (Steve Frailey) moved to Kauai, Hawaii in 1982 from our organic farm in California. There were no roads, electricity, water or buildings but lots of Noni trees (Morinda Citrifolia) in our valley. We also developed a deep relationship with Noni that was growing all through our valley.  Today we run our Hawaiian Organic Noni farm, and share the gift of health with people throughout the world.



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