Call us now toll free:
888-882-6664

Xenoestrogen and Lavender Essential Oils

By: Lola Frailey Saturday August 26, 2017 comments Tags: noni for skin, organic skin care

What is an estrogenic?

An estrogenic is usually defined as a substance either synthetic or natural that functions like estrogen in the body. The broad term for these estrogen affecting substances are “xenoestrogens”.  Did you know? Plant-based estrogen affecting substances are referred as “phytoestrogens”.

Xenoestrogens interfere with the endocrine system. They can mimic or block the body's natural process for producing and regulating hormones. Approximately 70,000 chemicals having adverse hormonal effects have been registered. Xenoestrogens are found in our soil, food, household and personal care products.

List of common Xenoestrogen Sources:

  • Bisphenol-A (BPA) used in many plastic bottles
  • Butylated hydroxyanisole (BHS) common food preservative
  • Konium chloride which is found in many creams and cosmetics
  • Phthalates found in perfumes, deodorizers, and air fresheners
  • Petrochemically based perfumes
  • Nail polish nail polish remover
  • Parabens found in many shampoos and conditioners
  • Petrochemicals in dryer sheets, laundry detergent, and fabric softeners. Some of which can make your clothing flammable

What about essential oils?

The most common essential oil, Lavender, has been under much scrutiny. There was an incident in 2007 where 3 boys ages four, seven and 10 started developing breast tissue. The boys were using lavender scented soap, lotion and shampoo. This may lead to concerns regarding the use of our Noni Lavender Lotion. Were are here to put your mind at ease.

A recent study was conducted that contradicts the 2007 findings regarding lavender essential oils as an estrogenic. In the study, researchers used uterotrophic bioassays to determine the effects of topical lavender oil on immature female rats. Over a three-day period, researchers treated four groups: 1. a group treated with corn oil, 2. a group treated with a synthetic steroidal estrogen, 3. a group treated with 20 mg/kg of lavender oil, and 4. a  group treated with 100 mg/kg of lavender oil. At the end of three days, researchers measured body and uterine weights. The conclusion was that lavender oil had no estrogenic effects on the rats(International Journal of Toxicology, 2009).

Another study published by the Research Institute for Fragrance Materials tested lavender essential oil as well. The researchers exposed baby female rats to lavender essential oil at extremely high doses. Approximately 6,000 and 30,000 times the estimated levels a human would be exposed to using bath and beauty products.  Group 1 was exposed to estrogen, group 2 corn oil, and group 3 lavender essential oil. The result? Researchers found that the group of rats given estrogen gained more weight than the rats given lavender essential oil. Additionally, they measured the weight of the rats' uteruses and found that the rats given estrogen were heavier than the other controlled groups. The researchers concluded there is no proof that lavender essential oil at these high doses cause estrogenic activity in the body.

In conclusion, we at Hawaiian Organic Noni do not put any harmful chemicals in our Noni Lavender Lotions.

The ingredient list is: organic noni pulp, water, grapefruit seed extract and organic lavender essential oil. Lavender essential oil is listed last on the ingredient list. There is very little lavender essential oil in our lotion. We have customers who are sensitive to lavender and can use our lotion. If you have any doubts or concerns feel free to contact us or leave a comment below!

 

Source:

http://bubbleandbee.blogspot.com/2009/09/lavender-tea-tree-estrogenic.html
https://www.futurederm.com/is-lavender-oil-really-estrogenic-2/
http://www.balancedconcepts.net/tips_avoid_xenoestrogens.pdf
http://www.mommypotamus.com/does-lavender-oil-cause-estrogen-imbalance/
http://www.alternet.org/personal-health/should-we-be-paranoid-about-hormone-risks-essential-oils

Lola Frailey

About the Author: Lola Frailey



Categories



Subscribe

rss